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forgetthebowl:

What are these things?
Why they’re goldfish teeth! Goldfish don’t possess teeth in the front of their mouths like some fish do, but rather have them set back in the mouth near the throat (within the pharyngeal arch). These are called pharyngeal teeth and they help break down food materials. Pharyngeal teeth are in one row and are somewhat molarlike, but narrow and smooth edged, without extensive grinding surfaces1 When you see your goldfish chewing food these are what they’re using! They come in lots of different shapes and sizes, and are constantly being replaced and regrown. They look a bit like ours don’t you think? 
Sources:[1] http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Carp_ID/html/carassius_auratus.html
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forgetthebowl:

What are these things?
Why they’re goldfish teeth! Goldfish don’t possess teeth in the front of their mouths like some fish do, but rather have them set back in the mouth near the throat (within the pharyngeal arch). These are called pharyngeal teeth and they help break down food materials. Pharyngeal teeth are in one row and are somewhat molarlike, but narrow and smooth edged, without extensive grinding surfaces1 When you see your goldfish chewing food these are what they’re using! They come in lots of different shapes and sizes, and are constantly being replaced and regrown. They look a bit like ours don’t you think? 
Sources:[1] http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Carp_ID/html/carassius_auratus.html
Zoom Info

forgetthebowl:

What are these things?

Why they’re goldfish teeth! Goldfish don’t possess teeth in the front of their mouths like some fish do, but rather have them set back in the mouth near the throat (within the pharyngeal arch). These are called pharyngeal teeth and they help break down food materials. Pharyngeal teeth are in one row and are somewhat molarlike, but narrow and smooth edged, without extensive grinding surfaces1 When you see your goldfish chewing food these are what they’re using! They come in lots of different shapes and sizes, and are constantly being replaced and regrown. They look a bit like ours don’t you think? 

Sources:
[1] http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Carp_ID/html/carassius_auratus.html

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